Aging in Place

The choice to age in place rather than in an institutional setting and the tools to do it successfully.

Tech Gadgets Help Seniors Age in Place

heidi Aging in Place Comments Off on Tech Gadgets Help Seniors Age in Place

 

Senior-friendly smartphones are just one of many gadgets to help the elderly remain independent and at home.

Senior-friendly smartphones are just one of many gadgets to help the elderly remain independent and at home.

Seniors and technology don’t always go hand-in-hand, but they may soon thanks to aging in place initiatives that rely on the use of electronic gadgets.

While a majority of seniors want to live at home for as long as possible (95 percent of adults age 75 and older, according to an AARP survey), many will rely on technological advances to help accommodate those choices.

From sensor-based activity tracking systems to senior-friendly smartphones, numerous products have hit the market that cater to helping seniors remain independent while also easing the caregiving burden on their adult children, reports USA Today.

USA Today’s list of some of the best new tech to help aging parents and their families.


Dementia Care Pilot Program Helps Seniors Age In Place Longer

heidi Aging in Place, Elder Care Issues Comments Off on Dementia Care Pilot Program Helps Seniors Age In Place Longer

Source: Home Health Care News

A home-based dementia care pilot program delivered by non-clinical caregivers led to a number of improvements in quality of life and delaying seniors’ transition from home to other care settings, according to a recent study.

 

Seniors received dementia care at home related to home safety, nutrition and physical health, and ended up living an additional nine months at home before being transferred to other care settings.

Seniors received dementia care at home related to home safety, nutrition and physical health, and ended up living an additional nine months at home before being transferred to other care settings.

While dementia can often be associated with high healthcare costs and long-term care placement, a program called The Maximizing Independence at Home (MIND) Pilot can keep afflicted seniors living safely in their homes for longer periods of time before the need to transfer to a long-term care facility or institutionalized setting.

The results of the program were detailed in a recent study published by Johns Hopkins University researchers in The American Journal of Geriatric Psychology.

Over an 18-month period, seniors who received care coordination under the MIND program via home visits were able to live in their homes a median of 288 extra days, or approximately 9.5 months. Read more


Boomers Mistaken on Paying for Long-Term Care

heidi Aging in Place, Home Health Care Comments Off on Boomers Mistaken on Paying for Long-Term Care

While baby boomers desperately want to receive long-term care within their own homes, many are ill-prepared in thinking the Affordable Care Act will help them do so, according to a survey from Nationwide Financial, reports Home Health Care News

While many Americans might not want to end up in a nursing home as they age, few are planning for long-term care costs. Additionally, 54 percent of boomers said they would rather die than live in a nursing home.

While many Americans might not want to end up in a nursing home as they age, few are planning for long-term care costs. Additionally, 54 percent of boomers said they would rather die than live in a nursing home.

 

Of the 801 Americans over age 50 that were surveyed, each with at least $150,000 in household income, only 28 percent knew that the Affordable Care Act does not cover the long-term care costs.

“Neither the Affordable Care Act nor Medicare will help America’s workers pay for their long-term care costs,” said John Carter, president and chief operating officer of Retirement Plans, Nationwide Financial.

A striking majority, 71 percent of affluent boomers, want to receive long-term care in their home, but fewer than half think they will actually receive this type of care in their home setting. While many Americans might not want to end up in a nursing home as they age, few are planning for long-term care costs, he added. Additionally, 54 percent of boomers said they would rather die than live in a nursing home. Read more