Active Senior Living

Simple strategies to help fend off disease and illness and promote an active, independent lifestyle.

How Super Agers Live Longer And Better

heidi Active Senior Living Comments Off on How Super Agers Live Longer And Better
Of course exercise and healthy eating play a role, but there are other things that may be even more important.

Of course exercise and healthy eating play a role, but there are other things that may be even more important.

Scientists have been studying the lifestyles and healthy habits of “super agers” (seniors who live extremely well into old age) for insight on how we can increase our health span, or the amount of time we’ll live in good health.

While genes only account for about 20%-30% of our longevity researchers say, lifestyle plays a key role in the majority of our aging. So exactly what can we do to live longer and better? According to an article from WebMD, eating healthy and exercise are likely to impact how well we age, but they are far from the only things involved, and they may not even be the most important ones.

Here is an excerpt from the WebMD article:

Lessons From the ‘Blue Zones’

Author Dan Buettner has researched people who live to be 100+ since 2000. He worked with National Geographic to identify five “Blue Zones” that have the highest percentage of the world’s longest-lived people. People in these zones also lived relatively free of diseases common to aging, such as heart diseasediabetes, and cancer.

The U.S. has only one Blue Zone: the Seventh-day Adventist community of Loma Linda, CA. Other communities include Ikaria, Greece; Sardinia, Italy; Okinawa, Japan; and Nicoya, Costa Rica.

Here’s what they had in common:

  • A plant-based diet— beans, whole grains, veggies
  • Opportunities for natural movement, like walking, herding, and gardening
  • Having a sense of purpose
  • Belonging to a faith-based community
  • Taking a daily nap or finding some other way to “downshift” daily
  • Not overeating and not eating after sunset

 

Read the entire WebMD article.


Owning A Dog Leads To More Walking And Exercise For Older Adults

heidi Active Senior Living Comments Off on Owning A Dog Leads To More Walking And Exercise For Older Adults
The study found that dog owners walked at a moderate intensity level, a rate that is effective in lowering the risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and other conditions.

The study found that dog owners walked at a moderate intensity level, a rate that is effective in lowering the risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes and other conditions.

NPR: Owning A Dog Leads To More Walking And Exercise For Older Adults
Dog owners often say the best thing about dogs is their unconditional love. But new research suggests there’s another benefit, too. Dog owners walk more. In a study published Monday in the journal BMC Public Health, dog owners on average walked 22 minutes more per day compared to people who didn’t own a dog. And they weren’t just dawdling. (Aubrey, 6/12)


Don’t Let Hearing Loss Impair Your Life

heidi Active Senior Living, Resources for Family Caregiver Comments Off on Don’t Let Hearing Loss Impair Your Life
Take these steps to improve your hearing and live a more fulfilling life.

Take these steps to improve your hearing and live a more fulfilling life.

There are 48 million Americans who have a significant hearing loss. In fact, hearing loss is the third most prevalent health issue in older adults, after arthritis and heart disease, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Age-related hearing loss affects one in three of us by the age of 65. And, although hearing loss has been shown to negatively impact nearly every dimension of the human experience: physical health, emotional and mental health, perceptions of mental acuity, social skills, family relationships and self-esteem, people often don’t seek available help for it, reports the Hearing Loss Association of America.

Less than 30 percent of adults aged 70 or older who could benefit from hearing aids actually use them. And that number drops to 16 percent of adults aged 20 to 69.

If you think you have hearing loss, see an ear, nose, and throat doctor (otolaryngologist or otologist) or your primary care physician to verify if you have a hearing loss and to rule out any medical condition.

If you think you have hearing loss, or if you are a caregiver to someone who has hearing loss, click here.

For more hearing loss statistics, click here.