Active Senior Living

Simple strategies to help fend off disease and illness and promote an active, independent lifestyle.

6 Powerhouse Foods to Help Fend Off Flu

heidi Active Senior Living Comments Off on 6 Powerhouse Foods to Help Fend Off Flu
High in fiber and probiotics, oatmeal plays an important role in maintaining immune function.

High in fiber and probiotics, oatmeal plays an important role in maintaining immune function.

You can boost your immune system by eating certain foods this cold and flu season, according to Amwell.

The following six foods may help to boost your immune system and help you fight off the flu or even avoid the flu entirely. The biggest chunk of research about preventative medicine in both the common cold and flu is centered around Vitamin C, but spoiler alert: it takes more than eating a ton of vitamin C to ward off getting sick.

Salmon

Salmon has lots of heart-healthy Omega-3’s and a good dose of vitamin D. Did you know that the same vitamin you get from the sun and fortified dairy products is vital to a highly functioning immune system? It helps your body produce antimicrobial peptides, which fight off illness and keep lungs functioning at their best. A 3-ounce serving of salmon has twice your daily recommended value of vitamin D, making it a perfect flu-fighting, immune boosting food for those dark winter months. But before you go and buy all the lox in your grocery store at the sign of a sniffle, vitamin D is a way of preventing the flu, not a way of treating it.

Yogurt

Yogurt is one of those versatile foods that goes well with any meal. An extra added bonus? Yogurt doesn’t have to be prepared, just grab a spoon and go. You already know that yogurt is high in calcium and protein, but it also contains awesome probiotics, which helps you fight the flu. The live active cultures in yogurt have not only been shown to reduce allergy symptoms, lower cholesterol and help maintain digestive health, they’ve also been proven to help prevent the flu and common cold. Your digestive tract is one of the biggest immune system organs. It literally helps get rid of the bad stuff, while keeping the good stuff in. The probiotics in yogurt help rev up the phagocytes in your body, which like your white blood cells, help fight viruses once they infect your body. Eating yogurt a few times a week can help keep those phagocytes revved up and ready to attack the flu. Can’t eat dairy? Look for fermented foods like miso and kimchi, which also contain great amounts of probiotics. Read more


KHN: New Guidelines Boost Diabetes Screening For Overweight Adults

heidi Active Senior Living, Resources for Physicians Comments Off on KHN: New Guidelines Boost Diabetes Screening For Overweight Adults
Patients with higher-than-normal blood sugar may now get nutrition and exercise counseling without paying out of pocket.

Patients with higher-than-normal blood sugar may now get nutrition and exercise counseling without paying out of pocket.

More people who are overweight or obese may get screened for diabetes under new guidelines released this week by a panel of prevention experts, according to Kaiser Health News. Those whose blood sugar is higher than normal now can be referred to nutrition and exercise counseling without paying anything out of pocket for it.

“Obesity and overweight have been risk factors all along for diabetes,” says Dr. Wanda Filer, president of the American Academy of Family Physicians. “But we haven’t had guidelines that actually said, ‘Screen those folks.’”

Under the health law, insurers have to cover preventive services that receive a grade of A or B from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, an independent panel of experts, without charging patients. Read more


Report: Everyone Will Experience at Least One Diagnostic Error

heidi Active Senior Living, Resources for Physicians Comments Off on Report: Everyone Will Experience at Least One Diagnostic Error
In addition to errors of medical treatment, more focus needs to be on diagnostic errors.

In addition to errors of medical treatment, more focus needs to be on diagnostic errors.

The Institute of Medicine published a new report in which it observes that nearly everyone will experience at least one diagnostic error in their lifetimes.

[Read Leslie Michelson’s Checklist for Avoiding Diagnostic Errors-The KHN Conversation.]

According to findings: Getting the right diagnosis is a key aspect of health care — it provides an explanation of a patient’s health problem and informs subsequent health care decisions. Improving Diagnosis in Health Care, a continuation of the landmark Institute of Medicine reports To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System (2000) and Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century (2001) finds that diagnosis — and, in particular, the occurrence of diagnostic errors — has been largely unappreciated in efforts to improve the quality and safety of health care. The result of this inattention is significant: the committee concluded that most people will experience at least one diagnostic error in their lifetime, sometimes with devastating consequences.

Read Getting the Diagnosis Wrong by Danielle Ofri, published in The New York Times. In her column she reports that it is estimated doctors get the diagnosis wrong in one out of 10 to one out of 20 cases. She writes: “Up until now, the focus of the patient safety movement has been on errors of medical treatment — incorrect medications or dosages, postoperative complications, hospital-acquired infections. But diagnostic errors — incorrect or delayed diagnoses — may be more common and potentially more deadly. The Institute of Medicine has taken up the subject, and its new report offers the chilling observation that nearly everyone will experience at least one diagnostic error in their lifetimes.”

Read Leslie Michelson’s Checklist For Avoiding Diagnostic Errors-The KHN Conversation.