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Care that encourages strong, well-informed and independent seniors.

KHN: Key Steps Can Help Patients Recover From A Stay In The ICU

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icu-recoveryKaiser Health News: Key Steps Can Help Patients Recover From A Stay In The ICU 
KHN columnist Judith Graham writes: “As many as 1.4 million seniors survive a stay in the ICU every year. And most go home, with varying degrees of disability. ICUs are responding to older patients’ needs by helping them try to regain functioning — something that families need to pay attention to as well. “There’s a growing recognition that preparing patients and families for recovery needs to start in the ICU,” said Dr. Meghan Brooks Lane-Fall, assistant professor of critical care at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania.” (9/15)

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KHN: Medicare Bars New ‘Seamless Conversion’ Efforts For Some Seniors

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enrollmedicareKaiser Health News: Medicare Bars New ‘Seamless Conversion’ Efforts For Some Seniors 
Susan Jaffe reports: “The federal government is temporarily blocking more health insurance companies from automatically moving customers who become eligible for Medicare into Medicare Advantage plans while officials review the controversial practice. They also will issue rules soon for plans that already have permission to make these switches, known as “seamless conversion,” according to a memo from Michael Crochunis, acting director of the Medicare Enrollment and Appeals Group at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.” (Jaffe, 10/28)


NYT: Failure To Improve Is Still Being Used, Wrongly, To Deny Medicare Coverage

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The New York Times: Failure To Improve Is Still Being Used, Wrongly, To Deny Medicare Coverage 
For months, physical therapists worked with Mrs. Kirby, a retired civil servant who is now 75, trying to help her regain enough mobility to go home. Then her daughter received an email from one of the therapists saying, “Edwina has reached her highest practical level of independence.” Translation: Mrs. Kirby wouldn’t receive Medicare coverage for further physical therapy or for the nursing home. If she wanted to stay and continue therapy, she’d have to pay the tab herself. (Span, 9/12)