Elder Care Issues

Advice on tackling common health care issues affecting the senior population and resources to turn to for help.

NPR: How a Simple Bump Can Cause an Insidious Brain Injury

heidi Elder Care Issues, Resources for Seniors Comments Off on NPR: How a Simple Bump Can Cause an Insidious Brain Injury

NPR: How A Simple Bump Can Cause An Insidious Brain Injury: It’s not just football players or troops who fought in the wars who suffer from brain injuries. Researchers estimate that hundreds of thousands of ordinary people in the U.S. get potentially serious brain injuries every year, too. Yet they and even their doctors often don’t know it. One such doctor is Bryan Arling, an internist in Washington, D.C. His peers often vote to put him on those lists of “top doctors,” published by glossy magazines. So it’s ironic that the brain injury he failed to diagnose was his own. And he could have died from it. (Zwerdling, 1/6)


Hospitals Step Up to Help Seniors Avoid Falls

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Hospitals offer classes that teach seniors how to reduce their fall risk.

Hospitals offer classes that teach seniors how to reduce their fall risk.

Falls are the leading cause of injuries for adults 65 and older, and 2.5 million of them end up in hospital emergency departments for treatment every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The consequences can range from bruises, fractured hips and head injuries to irreversible calamities that can lead to death. And older adults who fall once are twice as likely as their peers to fall again.

Despite these scary statistics, a dangerous fall does not have to be an inevitable part of aging. Risk-reduction programs are offered around the country. (Jaffe, 1/12/16).

Read entire article here.


KHN: Hospitals Step Up to Help Seniors Avoid Falls

heidi Elder Care Issues, Medicare Patient News Comments Off on KHN: Hospitals Step Up to Help Seniors Avoid Falls

Falls are the leading cause of injuries for adults 65 and older, and 2.5 million of them end up in hospital emergency departments for treatment every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The consequences can range from bruises, fractured hips and head injuries to irreversible calamities that can lead to death. And older adults who fall once are twice as likely as their peers to fall again.

Despite these scary statistics, a dangerous fall does not have to be an inevitable part of aging. Risk-reduction programs are offered around the country. (Jaffe, 1/12/16).

Read entire article here.