Resources for Seniors

Are You Sun Safe? Take This Quiz to Find Out

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To help protect against skin cancer, try to avoid being in direct sunlight between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

To help protect against skin cancer, try to avoid being in direct sunlight between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Are you sun safe every day? Take the American Cancer’s Society’s 9-question quiz to find out.According to the American Cancer Society, skin cancer is one of the most preventable forms of cancer. More than 3.5 million cases are diagnosed each year. An obvious, but very important way to limit your exposure to UV light is to avoid being outdoors in direct sunlight for too long. This is particularly important between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when UV light is strongest. If you are unsure how strong the sun’s rays are, use the shadow test: if your shadow is shorter than you are, the sun’s rays are the strongest, and it’s important to protect yourself.


Live Longer and Better By Doing This One Thing

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You are never too old to benefit from quitting smoking. Even if you quit at 60, you gain several years of life expectancy.

You are never too old to benefit from quitting smoking. Even if you quit at 60, you gain several years of life expectancy.

Quitting smoking is the single most important step a smoker can take to improve the length and quality of their life, according to the American Lung Association.

Some common reasons why you may want to stop:

For your health! According to the Surgeon General, quitting smoking is the single most important step a smoker can take to improve the length and quality of life. As soon as you quit, your body begins to repair the damage caused by smoking. Of course it’s best to quit early in life, but even people who quit later in life will improve their health.

To save money! It’s getting more expensive to smoke cigarettes. State and federal cigarette taxes continue to go up and in some places, a pack of cigarettes can cost $10.00. Even if a pack costs “only” $5.00 where you live, smoking one pack per day adds up to $1,825.00 each year. Read more


AARP: 8 Treatable Conditions that Mimic Dementia

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With the growing prevalence – and publicity – of Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia, it’s easy to assume that lapses in memory, dizzy spells, or prolonged forgetfulness are sure signs that the disease has taken hold.

More than 100 disorders can trigger dementia-like symptoms.

More than 100 disorders can trigger dementia-like symptoms.

 

And for many people, it has. The disease is occurring so rampantly, especially as the baby boom generation ages, that by 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease may nearly triple, from 5 million to as many as 16 million, reports the Alzheimer’s Association.

But what may seem like dementia may be something entirely different and treatable.

In fact, there are more than 100 disorders — from the side effects of medication to urinary tract infections — that can also trigger dementia-like symptoms, according to an article published by AARP.

Here are eight common disorders that can masquerade as dementia, with information on what you can do about them, courtesy of AARP.

1. Could it be normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH)?

Milton Newman knew something was wrong. For more than 33 years he’d had a thriving dental practice in Peekskill, N.Y. But over a period of about 15 years, his memory became fuzzy and his ability to do simple things around the house deteriorated to the point that his wife, Phyllis, was afraid to leave him home alone. “That was a terrible period,” Newman says. “I was a vegetable.”

He saw a series of specialists and endured a battery of tests, but no one could figure out what was wrong. “They all said it was the beginning of Alzheimer’s,” says Phyllis. It wasn’t until the couple sold their home and retired to Arizona that a new doctor recognized what was really happening. His problem wasn’t Alzheimer’s disease — it was normal pressure hydrocephalus, and it was largely reversible. Read more