Resources for Seniors

Checklists for Aging With Dignity and Independence

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Go over these checklists to ensure you and your loved ones are prepared for the aging process.

Go over these checklists to ensure you and your loved ones are prepared for the aging process.

The Scan Foundation came out with a checklist of things you should do to help yourself or a loved one age with dignity and independence. From conversation starters to questions for your physician, these “10 Things” checklists are a great resource to help you begin planning for the future you want as you grow older.

10 Things You Should Know About Aging with Dignity and Independence

10 Conversations to Plan for Aging with Dignity and Independence

10 Resources to Help Prepare for Aging with Dignity and Independence

10 Things to Discuss with Your Doctor to Promote Aging with Dignity and Independence

10 Things Every Family Should Know About Aging with Dignity and Independence

10 Things You Can Do to Support Aging with Dignity and Independence

10 Things: Videos with Dr. Bruce Chernof, who brings to life some of the tips shared in the Scan Foundation’s print series.

 


A Plan to Manage Your COPD

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This plan will help know how and when to take your medicines, when to call your health care provider, and when to get emergency care. It also lets you track how you are doing.

This plan will help know how and when to take your medicines, when to call your health care provider, and when to get emergency care. It also lets you track how you are doing.

Underuse, overuse, and improper use of prescribed medications contribute significantly to the severity of COPD symptoms, reports the National Institute of Health. Only an average of 40 to 60 percent of patients with COPD adhere to a prescribed regiment, and only 1 in 10 patients with a metered dose inhaler correctly perform all the essential steps of effective administration.

COPD is a chronic disease that makes it hard to empty air out of your lungs. This difficulty leads to shortness of breath and a feeling of fatigue. It is a progressive illness, meaning it has several stages.

Unfortunately COPD is a common condition that affects more than 12.7 million U.S. adults, according to the American Lung Association.

Adherence to therapy in COPD is complex. Patients with COPD require adequate education on the disease process, comorbidities, and also on the use of different medications and devices, according to the National Institutes of Health. They often need to make important behavioral and lifestyle changes such as starting a smoking cessation program, adhering to an exercise program, and wearing oxygen.

COPD Management Tool

One important part of managing your COPD is learning how to talk to your doctor and other healthcare professionals about how you feel, how to take your medicines and other medical treatments, according to the American Lung Association.

This COPD Management Tool is a 3-in-1 personal tool that helps you talk with your doctor to make a plan that is best for you. With a plan, you will know how and when to take your medicines, when to call your healthcare provider and when to get emergency care. A management plan also helps you track how you are doing, any concerns you may have and any changes in your health that are important to discuss with your doctor.

Each person’s COPD is different and so is each management plan.


Feel the Burn Without the Sunburn

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Wear a wide-brimmed hat to protect your eyes, ears, neck, forehead, nose and scalp from the sun.

Wear a wide-brimmed hat to protect your eyes, ears, neck, forehead, nose and scalp from the sun.

Feeling the burn is a good thing when doing a workout. However, if feeling the burn pertains to a sunburn, that is not good! The American Cancer Society suggests these tips while exercising outdoors:

* Exercise before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., when the sun isn’t as strong.

* Choose the shadiest route for your walk.

* ALWAYS apply sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher, even on cloudy days (SPF 30 or higher if you burn easily). Apply before you dress.

* Choose a sunscreen that blocks both ultraviolet A (UVA) and ultraviolet B (UVB) rays.

* Don’t skip the sunscreen if you’re only going out for a short time – you can get sunburned in as little as 15 minutes.

* Don’t forget to put sunscreen on your ears, arms, legs and hands.

* Don’t assume your clothing offers protection. If you can see your hand between your clothing and a light source, the garment will offer little protection from the sun. Tightly-woven fabric is the best option.

* Wear a hat with a wide brim to protect your eyes, ears, neck, forehead, nose and scalp.

* Choose sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of UV-A and UV-B rays, preferably a wrap-around style. They don’t have to be expensive to offer protection.

The American Cancer Society’s Slip! Slop! Slap!® and Wrap campaign slogan provides an easy way to remember the 4 key steps to sun protection:

1. Slip on a shirt.

2. Slop on sunscreen.

3. Slap on a hat.

4. Wrap on sunglasses to protect your eyes and sensitive skin around them.

More about skin cancer prevention.