Resources for Family Caregiver

Don’t Let Hearing Loss Impair Your Life

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Take these steps to improve your hearing and live a more fulfilling life.

Take these steps to improve your hearing and live a more fulfilling life.

There are 48 million Americans who have a significant hearing loss. In fact, hearing loss is the third most prevalent health issue in older adults, after arthritis and heart disease, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Age-related hearing loss affects one in three of us by the age of 65. And, although hearing loss has been shown to negatively impact nearly every dimension of the human experience: physical health, emotional and mental health, perceptions of mental acuity, social skills, family relationships and self-esteem, people often don’t seek available help for it, reports the Hearing Loss Association of America.

Less than 30 percent of adults aged 70 or older who could benefit from hearing aids actually use them. And that number drops to 16 percent of adults aged 20 to 69.

If you think you have hearing loss, see an ear, nose, and throat doctor (otolaryngologist or otologist) or your primary care physician to verify if you have a hearing loss and to rule out any medical condition.

If you think you have hearing loss, or if you are a caregiver to someone who has hearing loss, click here.

For more hearing loss statistics, click here.

 


KHN: ‘Boot Camp’ Helps Alzheimer’s, Dementia Caregivers Take Care of Themselves, Too

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Kaiser Health News: ‘Boot Camp’ Helps Alzheimer’s, Dementia Caregivers Take Care Of Themselves, Too
Anna Gorman reports: “Gary Carmona thought he could do it all. He’s run companies and chaired nonprofit boards. But since his wife was diagnosed with dementia, Carmona, 77, has felt overwhelmed. “I really see myself at times crashing,” he said. “In my mind, I’m saying, ‘You know, I can’t really handle all this.’” There was the time his wife, Rochelle, wandered outside and fell down. And the time she boiled water and walked away, leaving the burner on. “I’m always double-, triple-, quadruple-checking everything that she’s around,” he said.” (Gorman, 5/9)


FAST Is The Way To Spot A Stroke

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Although stroke can strike anyone at any age, it's more common in people age 60 and over.

Although stroke can strike anyone at any age, it’s more common in people age 60 and over.

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is cut off. Deprived of oxygen, brain cells quickly die. Someone who suffers a stroke may lose memories or abilities that are in the affected parts of the brain. Stroke can strike anyone at any age, although it is much more common in people over the age of 60.

It’s important to spot a stroke fast and get help right away. Here’s a helpful way to do it:

Use the letters in “fast” to spot stroke signs and know when to call 9-1-1.

F: Face Drooping. Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person’s smile uneven or lopsided?

A: Arm Weakness. Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?

S: Speech Difficulty. Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like “The sky is blue.” Is the person able to correctly repeat the words?

T: Time To Call 9-1-1. If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and say, “I think this is a stroke” to help get the person to the hospital immediately. Time is important! Don’t delay, and also note the time when the first symptoms appeared. Emergency responders will want to know.

Other symptoms of stroke may include:

  • Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech.
  • Sudden numbness or weakness of face, arm or leg. Especially on one side of the body.
  • Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes.
  • Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination.
  • Sudden severe headache with no known cause.

For more information on the stroke diagnosis and diagnostic tests, click here.

Courtesy: American Heart Association/American Stroke Association