Education Center

Health care-focused resources for seniors and medical community.

Don’t Let Hearing Loss Impair Your Life

heidi Active Senior Living, Resources for Family Caregiver Comments Off on Don’t Let Hearing Loss Impair Your Life
Take these steps to improve your hearing and live a more fulfilling life.

Take these steps to improve your hearing and live a more fulfilling life.

There are 48 million Americans who have a significant hearing loss. In fact, hearing loss is the third most prevalent health issue in older adults, after arthritis and heart disease, according to the National Center for Health Statistics.

Age-related hearing loss affects one in three of us by the age of 65. And, although hearing loss has been shown to negatively impact nearly every dimension of the human experience: physical health, emotional and mental health, perceptions of mental acuity, social skills, family relationships and self-esteem, people often don’t seek available help for it, reports the Hearing Loss Association of America.

Less than 30 percent of adults aged 70 or older who could benefit from hearing aids actually use them. And that number drops to 16 percent of adults aged 20 to 69.

If you think you have hearing loss, see an ear, nose, and throat doctor (otolaryngologist or otologist) or your primary care physician to verify if you have a hearing loss and to rule out any medical condition.

If you think you have hearing loss, or if you are a caregiver to someone who has hearing loss, click here.

For more hearing loss statistics, click here.

 


7 Simple Steps For A Healthier Heart

heidi Resources for Seniors Comments Off on 7 Simple Steps For A Healthier Heart

Taking good care of your heart and helping to prevent heart disease may be as easy as following 7 simple steps, reports the American Heart Association, which designed My Life Check®, a simple health assessment and improvement tool that you can do right now.

To complete the assessment, go to their site, click on My Heart Score, which directs you to create a profile. You will then be prompted to take the My Life Check Health Assessment & Challenge, which will produce your heart health score and recommendations to improve your health outlook. It shouldn’t take longer than five minutes.

Here are Life’s Simple 7 from the American Heart Association:

Manage Blood Pressure
High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. When your blood pressure stays within healthy ranges, you reduce the strain on your heart, arteries, and kidneys which keeps you healthier longer.
Learn how to manage your blood pressure.

Control Cholesterol
High cholesterol contributes to plaque, which can clog arteries and lead to heart disease and stroke. When you control your cholesterol, you are giving your arteries their best chance to remain clear of blockages.
Learn how to control your cholesterol.


Reduce Blood Sugar

Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (or blood sugar) that our bodies use for energy. Over time, high levels of blood sugar can damage your heart, kidneys, eyes and nerves. 
Learn how to reduce your blood sugar.


Get Active 

Living an active life is one of the most rewarding gifts you can give yourself and those you love. Simply put, daily physical activity increases your length and quality of life.
Learn how to get active.


Eat Better
A healthy diet is one of your best weapons for fighting cardiovascular disease. When you eat a heart-healthy diet, you improve your chances for feeling good and staying healthy – for life!
Learn how to eat better.


Lose Weight

When you shed extra fat and unnecessary pounds, you reduce the burden on your heart, lungs, blood vessels and skeleton. You give yourself the gift of active living, you lower your blood pressure and you help yourself feel better, too.
Learn how to lose weight.


Stop Smoking

Cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. If you smoke, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health.
Learn how to stop smoking.


KHN: ‘Boot Camp’ Helps Alzheimer’s, Dementia Caregivers Take Care of Themselves, Too

heidi Resources for Family Caregiver Comments Off on KHN: ‘Boot Camp’ Helps Alzheimer’s, Dementia Caregivers Take Care of Themselves, Too

Kaiser Health News: ‘Boot Camp’ Helps Alzheimer’s, Dementia Caregivers Take Care Of Themselves, Too
Anna Gorman reports: “Gary Carmona thought he could do it all. He’s run companies and chaired nonprofit boards. But since his wife was diagnosed with dementia, Carmona, 77, has felt overwhelmed. “I really see myself at times crashing,” he said. “In my mind, I’m saying, ‘You know, I can’t really handle all this.’” There was the time his wife, Rochelle, wandered outside and fell down. And the time she boiled water and walked away, leaving the burner on. “I’m always double-, triple-, quadruple-checking everything that she’s around,” he said.” (Gorman, 5/9)