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Health care-focused resources for seniors and medical community.

Driving Safely After 60

heidi Resources for Seniors Comments Off on Driving Safely After 60
 A yearly eye exam ensures your eyeglass or contact lens prescription is up to date and detects any developing eye health problem.

A yearly eye exam ensures your eyeglass or contact lens prescription is up to date and detects any developing eye health problem.

If you are 60 or older, driving a car may be increasingly difficult. Age-related vision changes and eye diseases can negatively affect your driving abilities, even before you are aware of symptoms. Some age-related vision changes that commonly affect seniors’ driving, according to the American Optometric Asssociation, are:

  • Not being able to see road signs as clearly
  • Difficulty seeing objects up close, like the car instrument panel or road maps
  • Difficulty judging distances and speed
  • Changes in color perception
  • Problems seeing in low light or at night
  • Difficulty adapting to bright sunlight or glare from headlights
  • Experiencing a loss of side vision

 

These tips can help you stay safe when driving, especially at night:

  • Use extra caution at intersections. Many collisions involving older drivers occur at intersections due to a failure to yield, especially when taking a left turn. Look carefully in both directions before proceeding into an intersection. Turn your head frequently when driving to compensate for any decreased peripheral vision.
  • Reduce your speed and limit yourself to daytime driving. If you are having trouble seeing at night or your eyes have difficulty recovering from the glare of oncoming headlights, slow down and avoid driving at night.
  • Avoid wearing eyeglasses and sunglasses with wide frames or temples. Glasses with wide temples (side arms) may restrict your side vision.
  • Take a driving course for seniors. Participate in a program for older drivers in your community, such as those offered by the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP). This can help you learn how to compensate for the physical changes that may affect your driving ability.
  • Have an annual eye examination. Yearly eye exams can ensure your eyeglass or contact lens prescription is up to date. It can also ensure early detection and treatment of any developing eye health problem.

 

Courtesy American Optometric Association


Respite Care Needed to Limit Burdens on Family Caregivers

heidi Policies, Resources for Family Caregiver Comments Off on Respite Care Needed to Limit Burdens on Family Caregivers

While that vast majority of older Americans want to remain in their homes through retirement, aging in place often requires some help—and the first choice for a caregiver is often an adult child, according to research from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.

More than 50% of adults 85 and older will have at least one limitation related to instrumental activities of daily living (ADLs), requiring some form of help, the Center found. As more Americans head into the golden years, more care will be needed. (Home Health Care News, Baxter, 6/6). Read Full Article.


Improve Your Strength

heidi Resources for Seniors Comments Off on Improve Your Strength
Stronger muscles can make it easier to do everyday things like playing with your grandchildren.

Stronger muscles can make it easier to do everyday things like playing with your grandchildren.

Successful aging means different things to different people. For many seniors, staying physically fit as you age helps reduce the risk of having chronic disease or help manage it better. Also, maintaining strength and flexibility increases the likelihood of staying independent and self-sufficient.

To strengthen your muscles, you need to lift or push weight. Even very small changes in muscle strength can make a real difference in function, according to the National Institute on Aging at NIH. Stronger muscles can make it easier to do everyday things like get up from a chair, climb stairs, carry groceries, open jars, and even play with your grandchildren. Lower-body strength exercises also will improve your balance.

The NIH recommends you try all four types of exercise below: Click on each link for a description of benefits, examples of how to do the exercise and safety tips.

Endurance

Strength 

Balance 

Flexibility 

Check out these great articles on staying strong as you grow older:

8 Best Equipment-Free Strength Exercises for Older Adults

Growing Older, Staying Strong

 


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